Music Manifesto

I grew up indoctrinated to become a musician  from the age of four so music was always a part of my life, if not my life. Music is really my all time teacher, beyond learning music in itself.
It has taught me various lessons, including how to be creative, patient, disciplined, undisciplined, and curious. Through my curiosity, music has taken me to places unimagined, even if it hadn’t been because of it directly, but also  to mental and physical places. Music is my altruistic history book that has also taught me about different cultures, different ways of thinking, and different ways of doing. Music has informed practically every decision I’ve ever made as well as becoming a pillar in the process of forming my ideologies. Without music, I wouldn’t be me. So I am indebted to it, but I am also honored to be able to contribute to its legacy.
Although I am classically trained, I did not focus on music academically. In fact, music was my inspiration to study other subjects in college, mainly political science and sociology. So, as you can imagine, to me, the intersection between music and politics, as well as music being an enormous sociological contribution, are always on my mind.
I have been concerned with two aspects of music lately. One is production and ethics, the other is distribution and ethics. On the production front, I have always found it to be a double edge that while the means of production have been democratized greatly, it also affords for a more homogeneous approach to it on the large scale. You have to go out of your way to sound “unique” in a sense because everyone is using the same tools. The mass production of instruments has also had an effect. To me, it cheapens the sacredness of the instrument to have all these mediocre versions of it floating around, only as symbols of the effects of capitalism. It is also most likely the most influential of art forms if we are talking about pop culture, which is also a side effect of capitalism, at which point it stops being a culturally rich sociological representation and starts becoming a product to be consumed.
Which brings me to distribution.
I was adamant for a long time about my nostalgia for the paradigm of the past, the record industry and it’s physical mediums of distribution. It was hard for me to wrap my head around the seemingly obsolete concept of making a record as an artist in modern times. Now, the one hit wonder is almost standard. On top of that, people in general aren’t concerned with an artist’s personality, philosophy, or ideology. The song reigns as a 3 minute digital distraction until the next 3 minute digital distraction comes along.
But then I thought…
I’m being nostalgic for a paradigm that is also a product of consumerism, albeit, a bit more artistically rigorous. The record sleeve, the pictures, the liner notes, the 3 minute song, the tours, the money, the drugs, the drama… all of those things were also a part of a system I did not agree with, no matter how romantic it all sounded.
So, what I want to accomplish is to be able to produce intellectually rigorous music, produced by instruments that are not products of an economic system that is tearing our world apart, and for that music to be heard, for it to be listened to, not consumed. I’m working on various fronts in terms of my skill set in order to tackle these different areas, and I realize that much of this work is not only  directly music work, but political work, tool building work, reframing and redrawing work. To take music out of the trappings of the economic system we live in and to create a new paradigm, while hopefully, people are creating those new paradigms in other areas of life.

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